Hyperpolyglots and Amikumu

If you’re a reader of the Welsh news site Cymru Fyw, you may have seen the magazine artlcle about Richard Simcock, who is very well known in the polyglot world – in fact, he speaks so many languages he’s known as a hyperpolyglot!

There is no magic number of languages you need to speak to be classed as a hyperpolyglot. Some put it at six, but having been to a Polyglot Gathering where I’ve heard people say, “I ONLY speak six languages”, I suspect it’s rather more than that; but whatever the number, Richard definitely qualifies.

In Richard Simcott: Y dyn sy’n siarad 25 iaith yn rhugl it explains that he has studied around 50 languages, but now speaks about 25 fluently. Interestingly, it was growing up close to the border with Wales and seeing bilingual children effortlessly switching between Welsh and English that helped to start Richard off on his journey of language-learning.

One of the points he makes in the article is how important it is to practise a new language as much as possible. To keep up his Welsh while living in Macedonia, for example, he tries to think in the language, and he listens to other languages every day.

Richard is also a user of the new app, Amikumu. This is available for Android and iOS, and can help you find language-learning partners in whatever language you want to practise.

It’s particularly useful to people learning Welsh in areas where they aren’t surrounded by Welsh speakers – both outside Cymru, and in parts of Cymru where English is dominant.

Here is a screenshot of Richard’s profile. You can only see the top 18 languages here, but Cymraeg is amongst them – not one that he considers he speaks to advanced proficiency, but certainly no longer a beginner.

How good it would be to travel all over the place – both within Cymru and to other countries – and find speakers of Cymraeg wherever you go.

The more people register to use Amikumu, the more possible that will be.

 

 

My little road trip

Never one for knocking back a chance to travel – especially through the beautiful Welsh countryside – I jumped at the opportunity to go to Derby recently for the One-Day Welsh School organised by the Derby Welsh Learners Circle. I was armed with a load of flyers for the new Amikumu app and the weather was stunning – Welsh autumn at its best – so I decided to make it a leisurely drive, calling in at libraries on the way.

I was a tad late leaving so Llanidloes Library had closed by the time I got there, but I carried on to Y Drenewydd (Newtown) and Y Trallwng (Welshpool). The librarians were very interested in the app and happy to receive flyers to promote it.

It was great to see the enthusiasm amongst the Welsh learners in Derby. They had come from Birmingham and Nottingham to spend the day learning and conversing in Welsh. There were enough for three separate levels – beginners, intermediate, and experienced (including some first-language Welsh speakers) – so something suitable for everyone. I had some nice surprises too – one participant was someone I knew from a recent SSiW bootcamp, and another was someone who had won a prize in this year’s Online Eisteddfod. I enjoyed chatting with a Japanese man who lives in Birmingham but loves Wales and hopes to live here in the future. (I didn’t miss the chance to practise a little Japanese with him as well, of course!)

I distributed the Amikumu flyers there and answered some questions about the app, before heading off down to Bae Caerdydd (Cardiff Bay) to stay a few nights with friends.

On the Sunday I headed into the city centre to meet up with Heather, the coordinator of the Cardiff Esperanto Group. I hadn’t seen her for quite some time so it was great to sit in Wally’s Kaffeehaus and catch up on all the recent events in the Esperanto world. Heather was one of the participants in a recent S4C item about Esperanto in Wales, which you can watch here on YouTube.

The next day the weather was absolutely stunning – cold, but sunny with a beautiful blue sky. I had arranged to meet up with a friend in Pontcanna but I was a little early, so I spent half an hour walking in Pontcanna Fields and really enjoying being out in the autumn sunshine. After spending a couple of hours catching up with my friend – all in Welsh of course – I walked back through Treganna (Canton) where I used to live towards the city centre. The water was like glass as I crossed the bridge over the River Taf, so I stopped to take a photo, which you can see above. A voice behind me said, ‘Shwmae Dee’, and it was another SSiW bootcamper that I’d arranged to have lunch with in the Hen Lyfrgell – the Welsh Centre in the old library building.

We walked there together, chatting in Welsh the whole time, and enjoyed our lunch, though more than just a bit disappointed to find that neither the staff member who greeted us at the door, nor the staff member who took our order could speak Welsh. The music playing in the background was not even from Wales, including Santana and Jimi Hendrix amongst others. Apart from a big poster saying ‘Shwmae’ on the wall, and bilingual menus (which were no use to order as the staff member couldn’t understand what I wanted and had to turn it to the English side), there was no other indication that it was any different to any other café in the city.

Still, we found a little Welsh conversation group going on in the corner and joined that after our meal. I handed out a few more Amikumu flyers, including a few to a retired Welsh tutor who still meets up with learners to help them. Apparently he goes to the Hen Lyfrgell every Monday and Friday around 1pm to give some conversation practice to learners who work in the city. Chwarae teg iddo fe!

The Central Library staff in Caerdydd were happy to have Amikumu flyers, showing me three different places they could put them on the Language and Literature floor. Hopefully they’ll be of use to people there.

Tuesday was Casnewydd (Newport) and Caerllion (Caerleon) day. I walked to the station and caught the train to Casnewydd where I was met by another SSiWer (and bootcamper), James. He is currently developing a website to show people where they can go to practise their Welsh, so that’s something to look forward to.

With James, I went to the Hanbury Arms Pub in Caerllion to meet a group of Welsh speakers. Apparently there has been a group meeting there every week for over 20 years! Amazing! I showed them the Amikumu flyers and one took an immediate interest in the Esperanto that is visible on the English language side of the flyer. It turned out that he used to be a Latin teacher many years ago. He asked questions about the pronunciation, tried out saying a few sentences, and asked me how to say other things in Esperanto. I suggested he use Duolingo to learn it, and the others said they wouldn’t be surprised if he did!

Next stop was back in Casnewydd to meet up with Mair from Stwff. After speaking with her at the National Eisteddfod back in August, she had offered to provide a prize for every winner in the SSiW Online Eisteddfod, so I met her to collect them. I can’t say what they are just yet as the winners haven’t received them, but as soon as I can announce that, there will be another post.

Wednesday was SSiW Stand day with Anthony and Ann in the Llandough Hospital. Anthony had obtained permission to have a stand there promoting SSiW so I took our popup banner along, as well as a few Welsh magazines and a pile of Amikumu flyers to make it more interesting. We were there for several hours and there was quite a lot of interest in learning Welsh amongst the staff. They were busy and couldn’t talk for long, of course, but it was encouraging how many of them said, “Oh I’ve always wanted to learn Welsh” and were pleased when we explained that they didn’t need to attend a class but could use SSiW to learn in their own time.

After farewelling Anthony, I was ready to head down to Y Barri (Barry) to relax with some more friends, but not before distributing a few more flyers in Chapter Arts Centre, Treganna (Canton) Library, Penarth Library and Wenvoe Library.

In the morning it was time to set out for home, but I called in to Abertawe (Swansea) on the way. First stop was Tŷ Tawe, where I explained about Amikumu to a representative of Menter Iaith Abertawe. He was interested to hear that Esperanto is gaining in popularity and asked me to send the flyer as an electronic version so it can be sent out with their weekly email. I had the same request from the Central Library, as they display material on large screens and they said they could promote it throughout the library like that.

Finally, I was back home at Nyth y Kiwi, Llandysul – tired, but really exhilarated after my little road trip. I used to wonder if I would ever get tired of travelling, but I don’t wonder any more. The answer is definitely NO.

Busy Times!

‘It never rains, but it pours’, they say. I’m not sure that really applies in Cymru as it mostly seems to drizzle very lightly here, but when it comes to working as a freelancer it’s certainly true.

There are times when I don’t seem to have enough work coming in and I start wondering if this freelancing lark is such a good idea, but lately it’s been more a question of ‘where can I get some extra hours to fit in all I need to do?’

Still, I’m not someone that likes to sit around twiddling their thumbs, so I’m not complaining. And I think I’m on top of everything now! Unless one of the agencies that sends me work produces something else out of the blue.

One of the work tasks I’ve had recently was hardly work at all – more an excuse to speak Welsh all day and enjoy seeing others becoming Welsh speakers. I was up in Bontnewydd, observing and helping out while four Welsh learners submitted themselves to a 10-day intensive Welsh course run by SaySomethinginWelsh and not only lived to tell the tale, but came out the other end as very competent Welsh speakers!

Next month will be my turn – my first time guiding another four people through their paces – and I’m really looking forward to it!

logoBut before I get to that I have another couple of language-based events to take part in. Amikumu is now available with a Welsh interface and is starting to take off, with more and more Welsh speakers of varying levels joining. Next weekend I’ll be heading over to the one-day Welsh school in Derby to tell all the participants about the app, and I’m really hoping I’ll be able to test it along the way by meeting up with a Welsh Amikumu user or two.

After that, I’ll be down in Caerdydd for a few days – catching up with friends, but also helping out with a SaySomethinginWelsh promotion event. So exciting!

So yes, finally after a lifetime of passion for languages, I’m finally starting to get somewhere!

And my dream of being a polyglot is starting to take shape as well. I’m having Skype conversations in German and French, and listening to the news in Spanish every day, plus reading in Esperanto and Welsh, and dabbling a little with Duolingo Swedish.

Now, shall I learn some Portuguese before I go to the Universala Kongreso de Esperanto in Lisbon next year? Silly question – of course I shall!

Farewell little bro

I remember the night he was born – my new baby brother. I was nearly five years old at the time and the commotion in the house woke me up. “Go back to bed”, I was told, but I lay there awake until my dad came back in the morning to tell me I had another brother. “Oh no, another boy!” I thought, but he was very different to the first one, and I grew to enjoy his quiet, sensitive ways.

He had a little suitcase full of plastic toys – mostly tiny little cowboys and Indians, but some bigger horses too – and I loved the times we lay on the carpet together, galloping the horses around, clipping their bandy-legged riders on every time they fell off. He loved playing ‘Clock Patience’ too, though I admit I tired of dealing the cards out for him well before he’d had enough of the game.

He was never a boisterous, noisy child – rather a quiet, deep thinker, who proved to be very able academically when he started school, especially in mental arithmetic. And he devoured books! We were very similar in that way, never happier than sitting quietly in each other’s company, both totally absorbed in the magical worlds we were reading about.

Perry’s mathematical and logical abilities were spotted early by IBM and he was taken on straight from school as a young trainee. He excelled at his work, and eventually left New Zealand to spend some time in the UK. But over the years he lost his interest in IT and began to think more about the world and how he could contribute to make people’s lives better. He rejected any kind of work that would just make money for individuals or companies and was not aimed at benefitting society in general.

Perry developed an interest in many areas and started to write. He published articles on the Helium writers’ website, and made thoughtful contributions to a variety of forums. He made a submission to the New Zealand parliament on the transparency of lobbying groups and was very keen to ensure that animals receive adequate protection and care, both in captivity and in the wild. He supported Kiva and made contributions to Greenpeace, Avaaz, and various charities whenever he was financially able.

But he struggled with what he saw as an increasingly money-orientated, heartless world and, around this time last year, after many years of trying to live according to his ideals, he took his own life. Only a week ago we came to know the truth of what had happened to him, though it has seemed the most likely outcome for some time.

Perry was not afraid of death. When he had low times in the past we had long discussions on life and what might come after. He felt there were two options – nothing, in which case he would be oblivious; or some other kind of world, a different dimension perhaps. He saw death in much the same way as birth – a doorway into another existence, one that he felt had to be better than what he saw around him. I hope he has not been disappointed.

I am extremely appreciative of the support I have received while trying to find him. Numerous people unknown to me have shared his photo and details, and only because of that I’ve been contacted by the person who played a large part in finding him and I’ve heard of the circumstances of the discovery. His remains have received a Maori blessing and were treated with respect and consideration.

Haere ra, little bro.

Looking Forward

So 2016 didn’t really turn out to be what I was expecting.

“No one expects the Spanish Inquisition”, as they say, but no one expects to get cancer either, so to say that I was stunned by a mammogram result back in May showing I had breast cancer is an understatement. Still, if I hadn’t gone for that mammogram I would have had no idea – it’s a very sneaky illness – so I’m glad I did, and I’m glad that we have amazing treatment that can knock cancer cells on the head. OK, the treatment kind of knocks everything around for a while, but you just cling on to the thought that, no matter how I feel right now, this is making me better!

I’ve made it through surgery and chemotherapy. Just a course of radiotherapy to go and I’ll be ready to tackle 2017!

So did my plans to become a polyglot get put on hold? Are you kidding? What better way to while away the hours in the Chemotherapy Unit than lots of language revision with Duolingo. Yes, while others were doing crosswords or listening to music on their iPods, I was blasting my way through lesson after lesson in French, Spanish and German.

I found my concentration wasn’t good enough to let me learn any new material, but revision was fine – especially languages that I had once been fairly confident in, such as Spanish or French. I doubt if anyone can actually say they enjoyed their chemo sessions, but I came close and felt I was making good use of the time.

All this concentrating on getting well has put my plans to become location independent in terms of work behind though, so that has to be my focus for 2017. I still have to have Herceptin injections every three weeks through to September, so I won’t be going a great deal of travelling this year, but I can certainly get myself in a position where that is more of a possibility.

My language-learning has carried on right through my treatment; in fact, it’s probably done more than anything else to keep me going. I set up several regular Skype conversations through Speaky so I’m gradually improving my conversational skills in German and French, and the people I chat with are starting to feel like friends. I enjoy Esperanto phone conversations from time to time, and I’ve started listening to news and podcasts in French, German and Spanish.

As I suspected, I can understand quite a lot of the French and Spanish, but German is still hard for me. I’ve completed the German ‘tree’ in Duolingo though, and more and more I hear those words being used in the Deutsche Welle Langsam Gesprochene Nachrichten (news spoken slowly). I’m also working through a Deutsche Welle interactive online course which is building my everyday vocabulary and adding to my cultural knowledge of Germany.

Did you know that in Cologne you can stand next to a parking machine, pay for the ticket using your mobile phone, and the ticket prints out of the machine? So much better than searching your pockets for the correct change!

But what about Welsh? Have I forgotten about Cymraeg? Of course not! I had just qualified as a Welsh tutor for adult beginners when I received the diagnosis, so no chance for me to leap into working in a classroom. I’m interested in doing online teaching though, or perhaps some translation work in the future so, with the help of a friend in Cardiff, I’m working my way through an old text called Cyflwyno’r Iaith Lenyddol. It gives practice at using the very formal Welsh of traditional literature with translation exercises, and I’m enjoying doing those.

So that’s it. 2016 is behind me, and after the radiotherapy, the cancer will be behind me. 2017 is the year I come a lot closer to my goals. Bring it on!

Colonial attitudes live on

I read this blog post – The Curious Case of An English Historian – yesterday and it really reflected the way I feel about the Welsh language.

I love the Welsh language. I love its history, its expressiveness, its connection to the country, the culture and the people, and yes, I even love its mutations! Time and time again I learn a new word or phrase and delight in its aptness and logic. It’s just so right to speak Welsh here.

So why do so many English speakers have a problem with Welsh? I’m lucky to know many people from outside Wales that share my love of the language and either speak it already or are learning it, but there are so many that seem to think they are somehow entitled to run it into the ground. They wouldn’t do the same about French in France or German in Germany, so why?

And why – for that matter – are there Welsh speakers that feel that if there is a single person within a 100 metre radius that just possibly might not understand Welsh, they’d had better speak English just in case? It’s NOT RUDE to speak your own language in your own country!

If you are dealing with customers, and one comes along that doesn’t speak Welsh, fine – speak to them in English, or French, or Polish, or whatever language that you might have in common. The idea of customer service is to respect the customer and give them the best service you can, isn’t it? And if they speak Welsh, then Welsh it is! Too bad if the customer standing behind them in the line doesn’t understand. What business is it of theirs anyway?

I’ve had Welsh speakers tell me that they couldn’t speak Welsh to me in the workplace because there were English speakers there – not visitors to Wales, but people who were born and bred in Wales, or had lived here for many years. My attitude to that is simple. If they are living in Wales and they have chosen not to learn Welsh, then they have chosen to exclude themselves from an important part of Welsh society. If they’re happy with that, fine. I would be the last person to force someone else to learn a language, but they must understand the consequences of their choice.

THEY have chosen to exclude themselves. THEY have chosen to remain outside the wonderful cultural experiences that open themselves to people that can speak the language. And having made that choice, they can’t insist that other people change their way of speaking just for them!

Windows 10 by stealth?

I meant to take up Microsoft’s offer of a free upgrade to Windows 10 before the deadline ran out, I really did, but somehow life got in the way and I just didn’t get around to it.

So here I am still with Windows 7, but an interesting thing is happening. Since July 29th – the DEADLINE for the free upgrade – every single time I turn off my computer it applies an update and I get that “Do not switch of your computer” message. I’m used to Microsoft updates coming through with reasonable frequency, but EVERY time? That just seems a bit too much of a coincidence to me.

Has Microsoft decided not to take ‘No’ for an answer and just secretly upgrade me anyway? Will I one day soon switch on my computer and be welcomed to Windows 10? Watch this space!

A year of challenges

World HandsSo 2016 isn’t quite working out the way I had planned – not even remotely close!

On a personal level, I’ve had to deal with my brother disappearing off the face of the earth – 5 months now since anyone saw or heard anything of him – and a totally unexpected health issue of my own. I’m not out of the woods yet – several months of treatment still to come – but I’m feeling fit and positive and thinking about how I can best make use of my time while I’m not able to be out and about a lot.

And what do I love to do? Yes, learn languages – and I don’t need to be out and about for that, thanks to the amazing Internet. I just have to discipline myself to concentrate on one language and stop flitting from one to another like the proverbial Schmetterling  …. yes, Deutsch it is for now. I keep letting it slide, so no excuses! Time to ramp it up a notch and organise some over-the-internet conversations.

But on a non-personal level, what a mess 2016 is turning out to be.

As if the Brexit shambles weren’t enough, we now have the prospect of the government of one of the most powerful countries on the earth being headed by Donald Trump. I can’t really believe it could come to pass, that so many decent, intelligent human beings could vote for such an ignorant, bigoted man, but then I didn’t believe so many people here would want to turn their back on Europe either, and that happened.

I was reading a statement by Stephen Hawking earlier this week, that the attitude that Brexit exemplifies could lead to the end of the humanity. A bit drastic, you might think, but I get where he’s coming from. Brexit and Trump supporters are not dissimilar in their “I’m all right, Jack” attitude. Neighbouring countries are having problems? Well, let’s just pull up the drawbridge, or build a wall, and pretend they are nothing to do with us.

The world is facing global issues on a scale it has never faced before. Human beings are changing the environment to such an extent that we are slowly making our planet uninhabitable. Selfish, bigoted, “I’m right and the rest of you are all wrong” attitudes are dominating in many places of the world.

The inward-looking attitudes we see portrayed by Brexit and Trump are reflections of what is happening on a more violent scale in many other places, leading to a global refugee problem. In the past countries like the US and the UK were seen as safe havens, places where traumatized families could start again and work hard to build their lives and contribute to their new country. Not any more. Sadly, too many doors are being shut in their faces. Where are they to go?

We can only solve global issues by working together. We need to be cooperating, communicating, supporting each other, finding solutions together. If we don’t, Stephen Hawking’s prediction could well come true, and it may be the only way that the world will be saved. Human beings may no longer be around to see it, and it might take a very long while for the nuclear radiation to die down, but eventually the planet will recover. It just might not have any people on it.

Tschüß.

 

Thoughts on Brexit

Europe

Although I consider myself originally a Kiwi, I spent many, many years in Australia. I lived in major cities like Sydney and Perth, and I lived in small, remote mining communities like Weipa. What I observed everywhere was that there appeared to be at least three parallel societies within the country as a whole.

There was a vibrant, multicultural, mostly born overseas, group of people that rejoiced in their diversity and genuinely enjoyed being together, celebrating each other’s festivals and feeling part of a wider international community. It was a delight to sit around a dinner table and discover that almost everyone there had been born in a different country, adding their own unique cultural background to the mix. Our ‘pot luck’ meals were fantastic! That was MY Australia.

Then there was a group that wanted to turn the clock back – to return to the White Australia policy of the past, to harden their hearts and deny compassion to desperate people fleeing unconscionable violence in their homelands, a group that were suspicious of anyone slightly different, that wanted to obliterate any cultural differences and insist on uniformity based on their own views. They were vociferous in their intolerance, and this was the group that the politicians sought to woo whenever it came to elections, pandering to racist tendencies and narrow minded attitudes. These people did not represent my Australia and sickened me.

The third parallel society was that of the indigenous people who struggle to have a voice and are mostly pushed into the shadows. They have an incredibly long and proud history, and I sincerely hope they will one day also have a future they can be proud of, though sadly I can’t see it happening any time soon.

Geographically, Australia lies off the shores of Asia. When Australians want to go on holiday, they buy a plane ticket and off they go – to Bali, to Malaysia, to Thailand – and all they have to worry about is what clothes to pack and how much dutyfree they can bring back.

When citizens of those Asian countries want to visit Australia though, it’s not so simple. My brother has a Thai partner who has to jump through hoops if she wants to visit him in Australia – a trip to the Embassy, showing all her bank account and business details, paying a significant sum for a visa, all under the scrutiny of a suspicious Immigration official who doubts everything she says. What gives Australians the right to travel freely to their neighbouring countries, while citizens of those countries are denied reciprocal rights?

So where am I going with this?

Well, one of the reasons I moved to Wales was that it was part of Europe. I saw it as a place that was proud of its own history, culture and language but was also proud to take its place amongst a group of neighbouring nations that were intent on moving closer together and building mutual respect and consideration.

To me the European Union represents the relationship that Australia should be having with its neighbours. Yes, it’s not perfect and there are obvious areas of bureaucracy that need to be streamlined and sorted out, but we should be doing that for the benefit of all, not just for the benefit of the UK.

I cringed every time I read that the UK was asking for special consideration and to be different to everyone else. Why? The whole focus of the Leave campaign seemed to be what do WE get out of it? It was reflecting the attitude prevalent in the second group of Australians mentioned above.

Well, I’m sorry, but I tend to look at it the other way round.

What can we contribute that will lead to an increased benefit for all? How can we add our skills and create a more unified and stable region, while encouraging and supporting diversity like the myriad of minority languages that exist within the member countries? How can we, as a group of diverse nations, be a shining example to the rest of the world showing that differences can be overcome and we can all work together for the better good?

I don’t know what the next few months hold, but I feel a sense of great sadness. Politicians with their own agenda have yet again manipulated large numbers of people by appealing to their basest instincts and feeding them misinformation. Welsh voters have had facts about the real effect on Wales totally obliterated by the hysteria in some of the English press. Our politicans have let us down by not making sure that all Welsh people made a decision based on accurate information, not emotional harping back to some glorious imagined past.

“Give us our country back?” – when, in the last 500 years, did Wales actually belong to the Welsh?

 

 

Making progress

polyglot

One of the aspects of learning more than one language that I have found difficult over the years is being able to jump from one language to another.

A while back I described the frustrating experience of happily speaking Welsh with friends and neighbours one week, having an Esperanto-speaking visitor come to stay for a few days, then opening and closing my mouth like a goldfish whenever anyone spoke to me in Welsh as my brain had completely switched into Esperanto and refused to go back!

I went to the Polyglot Gathering this time last year in Berlin, and my head was swirling – words from different languages jumbling themselves up in my brain so I didn’t know what language to speak at all!

What to do about it?

After giving it some thought I realised, of course, that the only way to master any skill is to practise it. If I wanted to be able to swap easily from one language to another, then that’s what I needed to practise. So I set about forcing my brain to cooperate: reading in Esperanto while listening to the radio in Welsh, sitting down to a Duolingo session practising one language after another, reading in one language and thinking how I would say that in another … and slowly, slowly it started to work.

It felt like my brain was physically resisting at first, then some kind of barrier went down – or perhaps a different neural pathway opened up – and all of a sudden it became a whole lot easier.

Spanish guests

Today I put my new skill to the test. After a whole week immersed in Welsh helping to run a SaySomethinginWelsh.com ‘bootcamp’ in Tresaith, I came home and welcomed Spanish-speaking AirBnB guests. We started chatting in English, discussing language learning in general – a common interest. I was asked about Esperanto and was able to produce a few Esperanto sentences without too much thought.

Then we decided to switch into Spanish! I was a bit rusty at first, but I didn’t have that ‘concrete in the head that won’t budge’ feeling that I used to get trying to swap, and lo and behold, the Spanish came flooding back and there I was chatting away in Spanish! Was I pleased with myself! Lucia is keen to improve her English so we’ve agreed to have language exchange sessions over Skype moving forward, selecting a topic beforehand so we can both research the vocabulary we need, then spending 15 minutes or so discussing the topic in one language, then the other.

And after my guests left, I immediately went back to thinking in Welsh! I might not be in the same category as some of the polyglots I’ve met, but I feel like I’ve climbed another rung of the ladder, and I’m definitely not slipping back down!